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j89wakeup:

There are more than 30 million Women and Children worldwide that are still affected by Human Trafficking.

j89wakeup:

There are more than 30 million Women and Children worldwide that are still affected by Human Trafficking.

US drops biggest-ever human trafficking case amid evidence doubts

rhubarbary:

- ­Federal prosecutors dropped the human trafficking case against the owner of a labor contracting company accused of exploiting hundreds of Thai farm workers.

We need justice!

A Shelter for Victims of Sex Trafficking Offers Counseling, Schooling and Safety

HOUSTON — On the outskirts of the city, a two-story lodge with a wraparound porch is largely hidden on a 110-acre site in the woods. Horses graze in front of the building, and a volleyball court and educational center stand behind. Down winding paths are a ropes course, a pool and a lake.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Baskets of toiletries await new arrivals at Freedom Place, a residence for girls who were forced into sex trafficking.

The Texas Tribune

Expanded coverage of Texas is produced by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit news organization. To join the conversation about this article, go to texastribune.org.

But the name of the recently opened facility, Freedom Place, cannot be found, and its address is undisclosed: it is the state’s first privately run safe house that provides long-term housing for American girls who are victims of sex trafficking. The shelter represents a new solution for state legislators and county officials as they try to figure out how best to support such victims.

“Typical emergency shelters — girls would just totally run from them,” said Kellie Armstrong, the executive director of Freedom Place, which can house up to 30 residents. The staff arranges counseling, schooling and recreational activities.

In Texas, the effort to end sex trafficking of minors has shifted since the Texas Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that domestic minors younger than 14 involved in prostitution should be considered victims rather than criminals. But the state has no “safe harbor” laws that establish a systematic response for providing minors with necessary services without criminalization.

Girls can often be distrustful or so manipulated by their traffickers that they leave if not placed in secure facilities. Many of the young victims who are not charged with prostitution must be charged with related crimes like drug possession or truancy to ensure that they are not released back onto the street. According to the 2011 report provided by the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission to the State Legislature, 66 children were arrested for prostitution and 53 children were referred for prostitution in 2009.

Freedom Place gives victims a safe haven. “We can’t decriminalize and not have places for these kids to go,” said State Senator Leticia Van de Putte, Democrat of San Antonio, the co-chairwoman of the Joint Interim Committee to Study Human Trafficking.

Seven girls currently live at the facility, where they will most likely stay between 9 and 18 months. The first four residents were referred by the Harris County Girls Court, which focuses on sex trafficking cases.

The nonprofit organization Arrow Child and Family Ministries oversees Freedom Place, but religious activities are optional. The home has a $1.8 million budget for its first year, largely from private donations and grants. The girls are checked on at least every 15 minutes, but the facility, with carpeted floors and pastel walls, feels like a home.

“We need to have a place to bring girls that isn’t a place where they are considered offenders but they are victims,” said Robert Sanborn, president and chief executive of Children at Risk, a nonprofit group.

At least one more such facility in Texas is being planned. As part of a public-private partnership, the Letot Center in Dallas County has begun a capital campaign to finance a 96-bed residence to meet the needs of domestic trafficking victims and serve other young girls.

efoxhall@texastribune.org

It’s Time to Make Slavery History, Once And For All

Given our own nation’s history, fighting modern slavery is an issue that resonates deeply with Americans, and it has been a rare point of bipartisan cooperation in Washington. This Congress, however, has thus far failed to pass a critical piece of anti-trafficking legislation: The Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA). This bill renews the landmark Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, which made human trafficking a federal crime and established the State Department Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons to combat trafficking internationally and monitor progress through the annual TIP Report.

The Senate version of the TVPRA was introduced a year ago this month, and has garnered the support of 45 Senate co-sponsors.  Although the bill cuts spending and passed out of committee in the fall, it has yet to be voted on by the full Senate, and has likewise stalled out in the House. The stalemate has bewildered activists and veteran lobbyists alike; as a New York Times editorial stated, “[p]assing a law to fight human trafficking and slavery is one of those bipartisan no-brainers that Congress used to be able to accomplish…”

echelonphotobook:

HUMAN TRAFFICKING - WHO ARE THE VICTIMS? // EHTN
“Estimates of victims vary widely according to the definitions used by the institutions carrying out the research and also due to the clandestine nature of the phenomenon.
[…] 700,000 to 2 million are trafficked across international borders annually, an estimate advanced by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).The US Department of State has estimated 600,000 to 800,000 men, women, and children are trafficked across international borders each year; approximately 80% are women and girls.UNICEF reports that across the world, there are over one million children entering the sex trade every year and that approximately 30 million children have lost their childhood through sexual exploitation, over the past 30 years.
Vulnerability of women and children
Recent UN statistics show that women make up two-thirds of the 2.5 billion poor living on less than US$ 2 a day.
Of the world’s illiterate,women come up to 66% and girls represent the majority in the 121 million out of school children, globally.
Women’s share in managerial and administrative occupations remains minimal with 33% in industrialized states, 15% in Africa, and 13% in Asia and the Pacific.UNICEF believes the most vulnerable children are orphans, HIV/AIDS- affected children, street children, refugees and those displaced by war.Lack of proper birth registration makes children more vulnerable to being trafficked.”
Source
© EchelonPhotoBook.com

echelonphotobook:

HUMAN TRAFFICKING - WHO ARE THE VICTIMS? // EHTN

“Estimates of victims vary widely according to the definitions used by the institutions carrying out the research and also due to the clandestine nature of the phenomenon.

[…] 700,000 to 2 million are trafficked across international borders annually, an estimate advanced by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).
The US Department of State has estimated 600,000 to 800,000 men, women, and children are trafficked across international borders each year; approximately 80% are women and girls.
UNICEF reports that across the world, there are over one million children entering the sex trade every year and that approximately 30 million children have lost their childhood through sexual exploitation, over the past 30 years.

Vulnerability of women and children

Recent UN statistics show that women make up two-thirds of the 2.5 billion poor living on less than US$ 2 a day.

Of the world’s illiterate,women come up to 66% and girls represent the majority in the 121 million out of school children, globally.

Women’s share in managerial and administrative occupations remains minimal with 33% in industrialized states, 15% in Africa, and 13% in Asia and the Pacific.
UNICEF believes the most vulnerable children are orphans, HIV/AIDS- affected children, street children, refugees and those displaced by war.
Lack of proper birth registration makes children more vulnerable to being trafficked.”

Source

© EchelonPhotoBook.com

halftheskymovement:

There are 2 million to 3 million prostitutes in india. Many enter the sex trade between the ages of 12 and 15. According to Ruchira Gupta of Apne Aap Women Worldwide, 90 percent of sex workers’ daughters in India join the profession.Learn more about forced prostitution

halftheskymovement:

There are 2 million to 3 million prostitutes in india. Many enter the sex trade between the ages of 12 and 15. According to Ruchira Gupta of Apne Aap Women Worldwide, 90 percent of sex workers’ daughters in India join the profession.

Learn more about forced prostitution

dontsellbodies:

IN CALIFORNIA, CHILDREN ARE BEING RAPED, SOLD & EXPLOITED EVERY DAY.
VOTE YES ON PROPOSITION 35.

California: home to 3 of the 13 worst cities for child sex trafficking.

California: received an F grade for its failure to protect sexually exploited children.

This November, Californians have an opportunity to demand better.

By voting YES on proposition 35 (the CASE Act), voters will mandate real changes in the criminal justice system that will protect victims, hold perpetrators accountable, and send a message to traffickers and authorities alike that Californians will no longer stand by while children and adults are raped, sold, beaten, and sexually exploited.

The CASE (Californians Against Sexual Exploitation) Act will

- Increase prison terms for human traffickers

- Require convicted sex traffickers to register as sex offenders

- Require all registered sex offenders to disclose their internet accounts

- Require criminal fines from convicted human traffickers to pay for services to help victims

- Mandate law enforcement training on human trafficking

If you live in California, vote YES on proposition 35 this November. And wherever you live - please join the 885,000 people who have already taken a stand against sexual exploitation, trafficking and modern slavery.  

Join One Million Strong Against Human Trafficking

If everyone who cares takes action, we can end this evil for good.
It’s time. 

Run for Freedom! 5k run to end human trafficking!

mandybrodnax:

My friend Meghan is having a 5k run to raise money for victims of human trafficking. Even if you don’t live here, you can donate to the cause.

Re-blog. Tell your friends. Together we can end human trafficking!

We love this! Thank you for running to end slavery!

sawyerlex:

How America rates countries on their efforts to prevent human trafficking
IN MOST people’s minds, slavery was an immoral practice that ended in the 19th century. But the huge amount of sex trafficking and forced labour in the world—estimates suggest there are 27m victims of these practices—has led policymakers to brand this as “modern slavery” and work towards its eradication. For the past 12 years the American government has issued a “Trafficking in Persons Report”, which ranks nearly every country on their compliance with America’s Trafficking Victims Protection Act (though the only sanction is opprobrium). The data in this year’s report reveal anomalies. All of the G7 countries make the top tier for compliance—except Japan, which is in the second tier. Switzerland, one of the world’s richest countries, is not ranked with its western European peers in tier one, but with places like Laos and Latvia in tier two. And there are tier one standouts, like Colombia, Nicaragua and Georgia. The countries in the lowest tier, mostly in Africa and the Middle East, probably won’t surprise many. The good news is that 29 countries were upgraded from a lower tier to a higher one in this year’s report.
From the Economist; full story HERE.  Click on the map for a larger image.

sawyerlex:

How America rates countries on their efforts to prevent human trafficking

IN MOST people’s minds, slavery was an immoral practice that ended in the 19th century. But the huge amount of sex trafficking and forced labour in the world—estimates suggest there are 27m victims of these practices—has led policymakers to brand this as “modern slavery” and work towards its eradication. For the past 12 years the American government has issued a “Trafficking in Persons Report”, which ranks nearly every country on their compliance with America’s Trafficking Victims Protection Act (though the only sanction is opprobrium). The data in this year’s report reveal anomalies. All of the G7 countries make the top tier for compliance—except Japan, which is in the second tier. Switzerland, one of the world’s richest countries, is not ranked with its western European peers in tier one, but with places like Laos and Latvia in tier two. And there are tier one standouts, like Colombia, Nicaragua and Georgia. The countries in the lowest tier, mostly in Africa and the Middle East, probably won’t surprise many. The good news is that 29 countries were upgraded from a lower tier to a higher one in this year’s report.

From the Economist; full story HERE.  Click on the map for a larger image.